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News/Business. Breaking and in-depth news coverage from America and around the world and the latest in sports and weather. New. (CC) (Stereo)

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03:01:00

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U.s. 33, Us 28, China 27, Ntsb 16, Afghanistan 13, Seattle 11, Washington 11, Ukraine 10, Jazeera America 10, Thailand 9, Syria 8, Nicole Mitchell 8, Joe Biden 7, The City 7, New York City 7, Detroit 7, New York 7, America 7, Seahawks 6, John Kerry 6,
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  Al Jazeera America    News    News/Business. Breaking and in-depth news coverage from  
   America and around the world and the latest in sports and...  

    December 3, 2013
    6:00 - 9:01am EST  

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with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america excessive speed may be to blame a train off the rails and data recorder shows the train was going three times faster than it should have been. a monumentel ruling for the motor city, a judge decides if detroit can file for bankruptcy today. resignation rejected, thailand's prime minister refuses to step down as antigovernment protesters storm her office building. and protection from poachers, how the illegal ivory trade is threatening elephants. ♪
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82 miles per hour, that is how fast federal investigators say a commuter train was traveling before i derailed sunday outside new york city. the train was heading into a dangerous curve and should have been going 30 miles per hour. good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, it's good to have you with us, i'm thomas. crews used heavy equipment to clear the crash scene and turned the derailed cars upright and put them back on the tracks. al jazeera erica has the latest on the investigation and good morning. >> investigators say over the next few days the rail cars and train will be moves to a secure location for a more detailed examination. at this point they have not determined if the train wreck which killed four people and injured 60 others was the result of facility brakes or human error but each day it uncovers information as the victim's families demand answers.
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the metro north train derailed after taking this turn at a speed nearly three times the allowed limit. >> the train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went in a 30 miles per hour curve. >> reporter: that is according to the national transportation safety board after analyzing the train's data recorders. >> when i heard about the speed i gulped and it sort of takes your breath away. >> reporter: another revelation the brakes were not applied until six seconds before the train derailed and throwing all 7 of the cars off the tracks and sending one dangerously close to the hudson river edge and looking to see if the brakes failed and they say the train made several stops along the route just before the recommend. as crews work through the night clearing twisted metal and writing flipped train cars investigators are trying to figure oust the cause of the crash and whether human error was a factor and william rockefeller is under scrutiny to see if he was distracted or
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perhaps sleepingly as the train went well past the 70 miles per hour speed limit even before it hit the turn. >> we will be looking an at the cell phone. we found distraction to be an issue in a number of accidents but not all accidents by any means. >> reporter: they have already tested the engineer for drugs and alcohol but have not released the results and rockefeller will face more questioning on wednesday and family members who lost loved ones are calling for answers and monday they gathered for a vigil at the crash site to remember the four who died including jim lovell who was going to work on the rockefeller christmas tree. >> so sad he is gone and not only is he my father and the closest friends, james ferrari taken from his family too soon.
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ntsb said investigators will be on sight for another week but a final report could take as long as a year and some safety experts are saying the tragedy might not have happened if the north railroad had a particular technology that monitors the brakes and keeps it from going against the speed limit and more on that in the 7:00 hour. >> thank you. sunday's derailment is the third time this year that metro north is the subject of an ntsb investigation and they are looking into metro north safety procedures after two previous accidents. on may 17 more than 70 people were injured when a metro north train derailed in bridge port, connecticut and struck by another train and two weeks later a man was killed under construction and we will hear more about the derailment
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investigation. decision day for detroit and a federal judge is expected to announce if the city is eligible for bankruptcy protection and the largest municipal bankruptcy filing in u.s. history and we are joining you from detroit to explain and this is just not about corporate debt movering and could hit residents very hard, couldn't it? >> that is right thomas, good morning to you, there are retirees who used to work for the city and right now they are on edge and i talked to a lot of legal experts about this case and strongly believe at this point that federal judge steven rhoades will talk about the bankruptcy but we know there are retirees who are very, very nervous right now because they risk losing a lot. after four months of court hearings a federal judge will rule on weather detroit is eligible for chapter 9
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bankruptcy. >> bankruptcy is a term that none of us ever want to get to this point. >> reporter: facing a staggering $18 billion in long-term debt, the city appointed emergency manager and kevin ore made it clear before the federal judge that everything from the city's assets like master pieces at the detroit institute of arts to encure debts like retiree pensions may be up for grabs. >> to me that is robbery. >> reporter: donald smith is one of some 20,000 retirees worried, anxiously awaiting the judge's decision. >> i'm not asking him to give me anything but what i earned. >> reporter: smith worked nearly 30 years as a city detention officer. he is concerned his $800 pension check could be stripped away or reduced making hard times even worse. >> there are days i have to makeup my mind whether i'm going to eat or get some medicine.
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that shouldn't be. >> reporter: retirees believe the pension funds which are $3.5 billion in the red are protected by the state constitution. it's an argument they hope the federal judge will understand in his ruling. municipal expert is doug bernstein. >> whether it's the pension or any other creditors the pot is only so big to go around. >> reporter: a federal judge steven rhoades says it's in favor credit will be reduced and if he rules against bankruptcy. >> we are going back to square one and chaos with lawsuits and you will see different creditors potentially trying to grab whatever they can get to satisfy debts owed to them. >> reporter: if detroit is declared bankrupt this morning they are expected -- the judge
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is expected to receive a reorganization plan from the emergency manager by the end of this month that will likely set the stage for the next phase of legal battles between the city and creditors which are expected to appeal, thomas. >> al jazeera and we are joining us from a very cold detroit this morning and thank you. dozens of factors led to detroit's bankruptcy filing from a collapse in revenue to mounting debt and in the next three hours we will look at the desperate legal move and during 50 years from 1962-2012 detroit's revenue fell 40%, since 1970 the number of city residents with jobs dropped 53%. the city's population has declined 63% since 1950. phone calls to 911 during the sandy hook elementary school massacre will be made public. a connecticut prosecutor said he will no longer fight to withhold them and a judge ruled last week that the recordings are not exempt from public information laws and the state wanted to
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protect survivors of the shooting and loved ones of the 26 victims and the town of newtown said the tape also be released on wednesday. the northern plains in north midwest are dealing with cold temperatures but it's about to get much worse and let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> we have a brutal system coming from canada pulling the air down and it moved through the dakotas and starting to move into nebraska with all the moisture along with it but the cold air is going to take a couple days to really settle in. so if you are getting a taste of the cold air and saying this is it, no, wait until thursday and friday morning and even into the weekend and that is when we will see the worst of it but we have had widespread areas of snow and some is heavy snow and places like arrow head in minnesota could get a foot and a half and a couple places isolated two feet of snow so that is almost up to waist high you will be digging out of.
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widespread and you get the cold and the wind. the wind will be blowing it so interstates like 90 will be treacherous and they could get a couple feet as the system comes through and the cold air will sink in behind this and this morning where the winds are picking up like bismarck feels like on your skin 3, this is going to feel balmy in a couple days because by the weekend it could feel like negative 40 when we add the cold air that will be sinking in. it will sink southward over the next few days and take a while to get there but it will be cold and i'll have more in a couple minutes and back to you. >> tensions cooled in thailand. crowds swarmed the government house compound in the capitol of bangkok after they told the
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police to avoid violence and stand down when confronted by protesters and this caps off the antigovernment demonstrations and leaders are asking for the prime minister's resignation and scott is live in bangkok. with crowds taking over the government house earlier today can you tell us about the situation right now? >> the situation right now is over the last few days and the most calm because there was clashes between the police and riot police and protesters approaching to some of the barricades and cement and bashed wire barricades that are in the sensitive areas of the city in the last two days and today they took them down and let antigovernment protesters go to the compounds of government houses as well as the metropolitan police headquarters and let them in the compound. so it's calm and a truce because
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there has not been any resolution to the issues, the stance on both sides and no negotiations really and that probably should start up again on friday. this country reveers the king and it's his birthday on thursday, so once his birthday is over with there there be attempts to negotiate with protesters and has not made any difference because the leader here who is in the building behind me is very wanting the prime minister to step down. >> the talks will continue. scott, what exactly are opposition leaders trying to achieve, what will ease the protest? >> well, they say and he said it time and time again the leader of the antigovernment protester movement he said he wants the prime minister to step down and wants the toxin regime wiped out and this is the older brother and former prime minister of the
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current prime minister and feels that the movement and the people feel he controls a lot of what happens in the government here and want that rooted out and that is their main goal and he said he will stay there and fight until that happens. obviously that is a very lofty goal and pretty high profile take over, sit-ins if you will, in very important government installations and institutions around the city and did not consider that as the victory, just small victories and he is sticking to his proverbal guns and wants her to step down and a change in government and that is the main goal and said he will continue fighting until that happens. >> scott is live from bangkok this morning and scott thank you. protests intensify new, ukraine and sees coup and fill the streets of kiev and want the president to quit because of the ties with the european union.
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>> translator: the government should resign and not fulfilling duties and make promises and don't do anything. >> reporter: they are calling for peaceful rallies and said ukraine couldn't afford to break ties with russia but now he sees he will try to reopen parts of the eu deal. the demonstrations are the largest in, ukraine since ten years ago. they are legalizing the civil unions for gays and they approved a ban on the marriage by a wide margin they are roman catholic and the prime minister favors a bill that gives same sex couples the same sex as marriage. u.s. is talking with allies today about how to keep the peace in afghanistan. secretary of state john kerry is meeting with foreign affair minister in brussels and afghanistan president refuses to sign a deal to keep u.s. and nato troops there after 2014 when the nato combat mission end
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and delaying the security deal could endanger millions of dollars in aid and foreign investment. vice president joe biden is trying to calm the dispute between japan and china. and he told japanese leaders u.s. will stay in it and they are concerned about the china dispute. >> the prospect for miss calculation mistake is too high. >> reporter: china and japan claim islands in the sea and tensions rose when they declared an air defense zone over the area and biden will raise concerns over the risk of miss calculation with chinese leaders in a few days. and healthcare.gov is running smoothly the obama administration is back in sales mode and president obama will kickoff a campaign today to promote the affordable care act. the white house wants to point out the benefits of the reform law and they plan to focus on a
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specific benefit each day until the sign up deadline on december 23, that is when anyone who needs coverage on january 1st must be enrolled. the white house is offering money to ensurers so people who like their health plans can keep them. the obama administration says the payments would offset the cost of reinstating cancelled policies and millions of people received cancellation notices and the cancelled policies do not meet the standards of the healthcare law. it was an attack that standed the dance world, now the verdict is in for a former member of russia's famed ballet and find out why you may have to pay sales tax for everything you buy online and the fight over food and they are considering cutting subsidies to some of the world's poorest people. ♪
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♪ good morning and welcome back to al jazeera america and i'm thomas and coming up, in a moment the verdict in the terrifying attack on the
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director of a dance company of the russian ballet and let's see what temperatures we will see across the nation and here is metrologist nicole mitchell. >> i should apologize for it and don't shoot the messenger and it will be brutal in the north and billings and we pointed this out yesterday morning and i was saying it's 40, enjoy it while you have it, it has done nothing but go down since and during the day yesterday and now at 14. the temperatures will continue to go down today, not up, during the heat of the day so to speak so we will have single digits by later this afternoon. so this is what is happening, with the front coming in it's going to just keep funneling the cold air in so some of the temperatures that will be single digit today will be negative as we head toward the weekend. ahead of that we have a little warm air and memphis and 60 and 70 the next couple of days and watch for the chill because it will be deadly and so cold by the weekend and back to you.
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>> it was a scandal that rocked one of the world's most renown troops, a dancer accused of targeting the ballet's director in an acid attack and a judge handed down a verdict this morning saying he was guilty in the january attack and al jazeera's is live in moscow and good morning to you and first of all can you fill us in on this case? >> yeah, this really represents the scale of the sort of poisonous relationship in the dance troop and ballet and this is not just any ballet, this is a icon and dates to last year and he was 29 and involved in a deep personal and poisonous relationship with the artistic director sergei and he enlisted the help of zarootski as he put
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it to rough up the artistic director because he was not giving him and his balarina good roles and he used acid on the attack on january 17th, nearly blinding them and he wasn't in court today and he is in germany continuing treatment to continue to safe his eyesight. the court has not handed down sentences yet but the prosecution are looking for ten years for the man who threw the acid and for the dancer in the attack. >> does the ballet hope the verdict will lift the stain on the reputation? >> well, obviously it hopes it will and i think the fans hope it will too but no signs of showing that. the company was founded in 1776 and only recently, in the last
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few years has come under a lot of scandal, of gossip and innuendo and a girl who joined at 15 in 2009 quit suddenly and talked about the cruelty in the company, the corruption, the sexual skeletons in the closet and said one of the artistic director approached her and said if you want a starring solo role you need to give me $10,000 and that is the time she quit and in the last 24 hours we saw the chief conductor leave the ballet so i don't think the cloud is going to go away in any way of a hurry. >> bizarre circumstances and peter sharp is live from moscow and thank you. and the busiest online shopping day of the year and the supreme court refused to step in a dispute over taxing web
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purchases and internet sellers must re-mitt sales tax like other businesses and amazon and over stock.com filed a challenge to the law and other states may start taxing internet sales and one said it may be the last cyber monday without sales tax. here is what is making other business headlines cyber monday looking more like mobile monday and spart phones and tablets boost to record levels on monday and it was one-third of the traffic. on line sales are expected to hit $2 billion, that is a 20% increase over last year. auto makers start rolling out the monthly sales figures today and november is expected to be strong for the industry with new vehicle sales coming in at more than $15 million. auto sales could benefit from black friday promotions and delay of october purchases because of the government shut down. analysts say discounting is
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driving the sector but one industry watcher says that is not the case. >> auto makers put about $2600 per vehicle worth of incentives and that is down considerably from what we have seen previously. so i think you need to remain discipline as an auto maker adding incentives for vehicles but sit a mechanism that works well with the industry. >> reporter: the south korean maker said it rose 5% and driven by the santa fe suv and other models. the federal reserve may scale back the economic stimulus program and u.s. stock points to losses at the open and dow jones opened 1608, s&p stands at 1800 and the nasdaq above 4,000 mark at 4045. overseas european markets taking
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the cue from wall street and trading lower for the third straight day and it helped lift export companies and the rest of the region ended the day mixed. the world trade organization is hoping to boost a package this week but some countries are not on board and india says the agreement ignores the needs of poor countries. officials say developing countries need security before backing agreements and wto plan means it would need to cut food subsidies and hale has the stories. >> feeding her four children on $70 a month is not easy and leaves the family with $10 for all essentials and food subsidies are a lifeline. she has applied for a government food ration card and soon may not exist if the world trade organization has its way.
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>> translator: we will get it for $10. but if we have the cards we can get the same amount of it for $2 1/2. >> translator: wto is trying to negotiate the first worldwide trade deal and means countries cutting food subsidies and how much should be given to poor consumers and consumers is the debate rich countries are having with developing ones including india. and violence across india came to new deli to vent the anger at wto and the indian government stood firm against the developed world and now the pressure is on india and up to 30 other nations to come into line and cut the help they give to the farming industry and poor consumers. earlier this year the indian government adopted a law that guarantees two thirds of poor people five kilograms of rice per month and say the subsidized
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program up to 600 million people could cost the government $20 billion a year and that is far above the current limit set by the wto. developed countries want those limits respected and that worries some charitable organizations here. >> and we still have millions who go to bed hungry and who don't have even one square meal a day so the government has to tackle that problem but until that happens i can't see the issue of subsidies going and certainly the world trade organization should not pressure rise national governments to not feed its own people first. >> reporter: the indian golf doesn't want to see a return to the days after independence when it asks the international community for food and since then indians worked very hard to prove they can feed their the says it won't be dictated too by the international community as to how to feed the most vulnerable in society and i'm in new deli.
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>> reporter: officials last week asked wto to ask for a food program for four years and india will have support for the wto global trade deal. a legal battle is going on and aclu is taking aim at catholic bishops and a new battleground in the long gaza strip feud and some palestinians are taking the fight of israelis to the high seas. south africa elephants in danger and what is being done to p protect the creatures from poachers. we will explain why the seahawks are flying by in a bit. this is a live look at ukraine where protesters continue to fill the streets to protest the president's decision not to sign a trade deal with the european union and we are coming right back.
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doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is
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that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> this isn't a new channel, this is a watershed moment in media for america. >> this entire region is utterly devastated. >> people our here are struggling. >> the fire jumped the highway we took earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch high quality journalism, period. >> start with one issue ad guests on all sides of the debate. and a host willing to ask the tough questions and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5pm et / 2pm pt only on al jazeera america
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♪ hello and welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm thomas and good to have you with us and these are top stories we are following at this hour. accident investigators now say excessive speed played a role in the train demailment outside of new york city and going over 80 miles per hour in a curve stretch of track and should have been doing 30 and they are trying to see if he was distracted or asleep. a judge will decide if detroit can go ahead with the bankruptcy case and the city is $18 billion in debt filed the largest municipal bankruptcy in history. antigovernment protesters swarm government billings in bangkok
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and the program is done and disagreement about why iran signed it and sanctions did not force iran to the bargaining table and the u.s. disagrees and we report from the state department. >> handshakes, smiles, a deal, the international community recently celebrated an agreement to ensure iran's nuclear program stays peaceful but now the foreign minister tells al jazeera his country struck the deal because it wanted to, not because of u.s.-led economic sanctions. >> and they had 20 0 centerfuge and the product is 18,800 centerfuges added to the stock of them. so sanctions have utterly failed.
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>> reporter: the obama administration contradicted the version of events. >> there is no question if you look just at the facts of the impact of oil revenues, the impact on their economic growth at large that there was a huge impact of -- the sanctions had an enormous impact and that was a driving factor in bringing the iranians back to the negotiating table. >> reporter: if the nuclear deal succeeds they may cooperate on other matters including syria and they suggested to al jazeera that iran, which supports the assad regime could be useful at the peace talks known as geneva two and the u.s. response. >> to create a governing body is the goal of the geneva conference and certainly they have to embrace that as the focus of the geneva communication. >> reporter: it is in the middle of what could be described as a charm offensive and visiting saudia arabi and
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say saying that iran is trying to be a good neighbor. >> we need to cooperate with each other to, in fact, contain the spread of sectarian divide in the region. >> reporter: north he said on monday is new but the iranian government's willingness to assert itself is attracting attention in the obama administration and studied closely. >> reporter: a group of senators is working on a bill calling for more sanctions if iran doesn't live up to the deal and the white house worries that it could hurt the agreement. there is overwhelming evidence that syria's president is guilty of war crimes and the human rites chief said an inquiry found assad and senior officials authorized these actions. >> the facts point to the
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commission of very serious crimes and war crimes and crimes against humanity and point to the fact that the evidence indicates responsibility at the highest level of government including the head of state. >> reporter: investigators say the systematic nature of human rights abuses in syria point to government policy and this is the first time the u.s. has directly implicated the syrian president and more than 100,000 people have been killed in the conflict. the u.n. says afghanistan is the world east most dangerous place for relief worker and said attacks on aid workers fripelled there and 36 have been killed and 46 injured and u.n. are not saying blame for attacks but taliban has taken responsible for many of them. activists including one american boerted boats in the gaza strip with restrictions on waterways
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in the mediterranean sea. israeli government said imports are monitored to prevent dangerous materials from entering occupied territory and the six mile restrictions hurt the economy and al jazeera's nick has more from jerusalem. >> six years israel controlled the seas and today activists wanted to take them back and living in gaza cannot go six miles from the coast and war ships block everything going in and going out and they say that strangled the economy and so they challenge the blockade and going straight for israeli ships and aware of the risk and they arrested and they attacked for sailing more than six miles out. >> we are armed with international law and they saying this is our sea, this is our land, this is our sky, you
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shouldn't be here. >> reporter: by challenging the blockade israel may stop or attack them but with two thirds of the people in gaza living on $6 a day they have nothing to loose and it's about security and fired rockets from gaza into israel and israel said to prevent it it most block cement that have been used in attacks. and for palestinians this is about their livelihood in an area where raw sewage runs through the streets and power cuts are more than 12 hours a day and the blockade increases suffering and unemployment is over 40% and there is a saying that in each bag of cement there are 45 jobs but it's meant the construction projects like this one are ground to a halt and that made economic conditions here more miserable. mohamed and his 7 children are owed a new house and his because
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bulldozed by israeli from 2004 and he is an nomad without a permanent home. >> because of this my children are failing out of school. >> i initially thought i would stay a few weeks and three years later here i am. >>. he has seen people struggle up close and doesn't blame them for being angry. >> there is not much anyone can reasonably be expected to do other than resist. >> reporter: if continues continue to get worse anger could erupt. >> it's accumulating inside gaza people and it's a distracting element and we are afraid we are the age of a new round of violence. >> reporter: the fisherman decided not to risk the war ships and stopped a half mile short and promise to keep challenging the blockade because they say they can't go on living like this. and nick with al jazeera gaza.
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we should note israel set up blockades on gaza and some were lifted in 2010 after an israeli, raid. >> and he was serving a term of 26 years for man slaughter but a federal judge overturned the conviction saying warren was tried unfairly. a former hospital worker in new hampshire is sentenced for knowingly causing a hepatitis c out break and stole painkillers and swapped them for syringes tainted with his blood and went one job to the next as a cardiac technologist and since then 46 people have been diagnosed with a strain of hepatitis c he carries. >> he destroyed my life and i
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have a lot of residenceless and sleepless nights, terrible thoughts and it's scary. i just wanted to wonder when my day is going to come where i can no longer live because of the hepatitis c. >> reporter: he said he was okay and he was addicted to painkillers and alcohol and sentenced to 39 years in prison. elephants in africa are in extreme danger and porcher whose are killing the animals for ivory tusks could wipe them out and al jazeera tanya page is seeing what is being done to save these elephants. >> all of the elephants in south africa survive behind fences and it provides safety but the trade-in illegal ivory is lucrative and demand pushed poaching to critical levels elsewhere on the continent. and it's estimated there are fewer than half a million elephants left in africa compared with 1.2 in 1980 and
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could be extinct in her lifetime. >> elephants are one of the most intelligent and research has shown this, very comparable to humans. and for us to get to a state where humans, you know, care that little about not only themselves but wildlife would be a very sad day. >> reporter: some parts of asia is more than gold and they poison the elephants and shoot them from helicopters sometimes with machine guns and the government is hosting a follow-up meeting to talk earlier this year on the convention of international trade-in endangered species and during the summit 8 countries were accused of not doing enough to tackle ivory trafficking. >> there is a lot more calling for regional collaboration
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across the board to account of this threat because it's not just a threat to wildlife. the proceeds from this particular trade or industry has been something it can fund and fund other illegal activities as well. >> reporter: as well as how ivory influences peace and security and the involvement of organized crime, the delegates will discuss how to stem demand for ivory in asia. a lot of the problem comes down to a lack of understanding about where ivory comes from. a survey by the international fund for animal welfare found 70% of chinese didn't know elephants were killed for their tusks. six tons of seized ivory was recently crushed in the united states and it was confiscated over 25 years and unless all the countries involved act now
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wildlife campaigns said the tusks could be what is left of the elephants and i'm in south africa. >> reporter: international ivory and it has gone to $1,000 a pound and a huge incentive to break the law and thousands were killed last year in africa. and they must identify the priests accused of molesting children and the names of 46 priests must be released and includes 33 priests in st. paul, minnesota and 13 more in the wionna diocese and an attorney says the decision is a milestone especially for those who have not come forward. >> survivors who are suffering alone in silence thinking they are the only ones who were
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abused can now know they may not be alone. >> reporter: and they have until december 17 to make the names public. the american civil liberties union is suing the catholic bishops and saying it's on guidelines they oppose on abortions on church-run hospitals and say they were negligent and sites a case of a woman who was not told continuing her pregnancy continued grave problems and she was from michigan and her baby died in hours and the conference of bishops is not commenting on the case. a growing call for changes and invitro fertilization is performed in the u.s. and they want doctors to transfer only one embryo into a women per cycle and the goal is to reduce multiple births and carrying multiples during pregnancy increases premature birth and suggested guidelines go to women 35 or older and older women with
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lower conception rates could have multiple embryos transferred and the seahawks were loud. >> and seattle fans were just loud, louder than yours truly believe it or not because there was a world record outside at 137 desables and this is the league end of boom and here comes the boom, baby, drew brees tosses it and off to the races and takes it 22 yards to the happy place and seahawks 10-0 lead and wilson goes to zach miller from arizona state and fans are going bananas and sea
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attle 17-0 and this show downturned out to be a blowout and seattle was tipsy and off the hands of davis and right to derrick and it was that night, 310 yards and three touchdowns as seattle spanks them 34-7 approve 11-1 on the season and they are the first team to punch their ticket to the playoffs and next up is the number one seat in n fchl c and advantage and what do you say, russell? >> for us to come out in that fashion and win that game, the way we did was pretty awesome and clicking offensively and defensively and the crowd was unbelievable tonight and broke the world record again so just the energy in the stadium you can feel the ground shaking and makes a huge difference. >> they are living large because seahawks have the best record
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and trailblazers are sitting pretty on the conference and portland had it tough with the 16-1 pacers, can you say nba preview and a three point and ditto for rallying back and making it rain and racked up a high 43 points and pacers down by two and unfortunately that is as close as they would get because they would steal the deal and blazers win 106-102 and 15-3 in the season. 12 yukon and florida and what was an epic finish and the roller coaster ride was back and forth and florida goes one point as michael frazier kisses it off the glass and up 64-63 and yukon had one last chance to pump up the volume. >> eight seconds to go and let's wrap it up.
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>> in trouble with five seconds to go and leans in, that is no good and napier for the win! he got it. >> celebration begins and rush the court, they are running off the court and bob has the money shot as time expires and 65-64 yukon and 8-0 on the season. on the college grid iron he said hello usc, the trojans had a new head coach as well as the interim coach who quit after hearing the news and he is la guy growing up in torence and spent seizes there before taking the job there and he turned around the huskys with 34-29 record and 5 season and hoping to bring the glory days back to usc and the coach and two heisman trophy winners. >> we can see what he can do with the team and thank you.
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you can call them masters of memory, people who are stretching their minds to the limit, we will meet contestants at the world memory championships plus a reward for stolen treasure, what a top whiskey maker is doing to get pricey bourbon back. >> reporter: we are dealing with snow and blowing snow and not the only hazard on the road and i will have your forecast coming up.
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>> and now, a techknow minute...
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this is al jazeera america and i'm thomas and a story you won't soon forget about people with spectacular memories and we will see who will see the snow and rain across the country and we have nicole mitchell. >> this will bring the brutal temperatures and bringing show to the midwest and plains and if you are on 94 or 90 going through dakotas it's not pretty. the southern tier and illinois
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to arkansas and texas and louisiana enough moisture and with temperatures cooling overnight widespread folk and the roads you can't see and the midwest you see the moisture and sinking southward that could be an ice storm by later in the week and a lot to worry about with this system and back to you. >> thank you, police in kentucky are hoping a sizable reward will solve the bourbon and van winkle and there is no sign of the alcohol valued at almost $30,000. police are offering $10,000 reward for information leading to an arrest. >> there are several other cases we work daily and weekly and things that happen and all of the sudden you have to decide what is more important, crimes
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to a person is more important than a crime of theft. >> the sheriff said it was probably an inside job and they interviewed more than 100 people. it is a competitive sport, exercising the power of the brain. more than 100 people from around the world have been competing in the world memory championships in england and you don't have to be a genius to enter the competition, as paul reports you have to have a steel trap for a memory. >> there are people in the room who can remember the order of the packs of cards and random numbers and remember more than 4,000 digit long of bindery numbers and seems unbelievable until you see them do it. >> people think it's boring and looking at the numbers but the truth is during memorization time we create a lot of pictures
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in our mind because our memory is colorful and really something exciting. >> reporter: among the contestants and ten separate trials of recall the reigning world champion and a smattering of former champions and germany and china has biggest teams and well represented despite last month's typhoon and not just the concentration in the room but the spread of the sport in resent years, more than 30 countries are represented at the world championships and including for the first time countries such as algeria and it changed my life and this year i had many new experiences and made many new friends.
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after three days of intense concentration a new champion is crowned and she began competing just over a year ago and gave film 9, 4, 6, 2, 5, 1. what is his system i asked him. >> every two-digit number is a person or object in the sequence so 9, 4 is a guy i know with a lot of hair. and then 6, 2 is teaching so i see this guy teaching and 5, 1 is skulls so he is teaching skulls. >> reporter: and you memorized. what is your maximum? >> i managed 2280. >> 2280. >> yeah. >> wow. >> and images and you have to focus on one image at a time in one place it doesn't feel like so much work when you are doing it. >> reporter: one thing to remember, practice, practice,
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practice and paul brennon. >> they train up to ten hours a day to prepare and stephanie sy has a look at what we are working on in the next hour. >> federal investigators say the train that derailed in new york city was traveling at 82 miles per hour when it went off the tracks but the ntsb is not clear if human error or faulty equipment is to blame and a judge will make a decision on the detroit bankruptcy case and if the chapper 9 filing can move forward and they swarmed a government compound in thailand after they lifted barricades in an attempt to end it. ahead in the next hour we will have more on the deadly train derailment including a live interview and a member of the ntsb which is leading the accident investigation and vice president joe biden kicks off a
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week-long trip to asia and what he is facing. >> the denver broncos and after a month john fox is back at work after surgery. a system is bringing blowing snow to plummeting temperatures and i'll have your forecast. >> there is near ahead on al jazeera america and stephanie and i are back with you in 2 1/2 minutes and this is where they are meeting and secretary of state john kerry will be there discussing violence in afghanistan. we are coming right back. >> its unbiased, fact-based, in-depth journalism. >> you give them the facts, dispense with the fluff and get
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straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news.
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>> excessive speed may be to blame for sending a new york commuter train off the rails. data recorder show the train was going three times faster than it should have been. >> resignation rejected. thigh landed prime minister refuse to say step down as protestors storm her office this. >> a judge decides if detroit will go into bankruptcy today. >> at least that person who see. >> helping the disabled in afghanistan move forward with their lives.
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>> excessive speed is being sited as a factor in sunday's deadly train derailment in new york city. investigators say it was traveling nearly three times the speed limit as it approached the curve. >> crews have been making progress as they worked to clear the crash scene, using heavy equipment to turn the derailed cars upright and get them back on the tracks. once that is done, track repairs can get underway. >> we have more now on the investigation. >> over the next few days, the rail cars and locomotives will be moved to a secure location for a more detailed examination. at this point, they have not determined if the train wreck which killed four and injured 60 others was the result of faulty breaks or human error.
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>> the train derailed after taking this turn at a speed nearly three times the allowed limit. >> the train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30-mile per hour curve. >> that's according to the national transportation safety board after analyzing the train's data recorders. >> when i heard about the speed, i gulped. it sort of takes your breath away. >> another revelation, the brakes were not applied until six seconds before the train derailed, throwing all season scars off the tracks, sending one dangerously close to the hudson river. investigators are looking to see if the brakes failed, although they say the train made several stops along the route just before the wreck. as crews worked through the night, clearing twisted metal and uprighting cars, investigators are trying to figure the cause of the crash and whether how many error was a factor. the train's engineer, william
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rockefeller is under scrutiny to see if he was distracted or sleeping before the train hit the curve. >> we certainly will be looking at the cell phone. we found distraction to be an issue in a number of accidents, but not all accidents, by any means. >> investigators have tested the engineer for drugs and alcohol but have not released results. rockefeller will face more questioning wednesday. in the meantime, family members who lost loved ones are calling for answers. late monday, they gathered near the crash site to remember the four who died, including jim lovell. >> just so sad that he's gone. >> another father taken from his family too soon. >> the answers those families want will not come quickly.
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investigators will be on site for another week, but a final report could take as long as a year. >> some safety experts have talked a technology that already exists that might have prevented sunday's crash. >> congress has already ordered all railroads to have it in place by december of 2015. this is a promotional video from the association of american railroads, this system is called positive train control or p.t.c. it's a sophisticated system of sensors on the rails and in the locomotive that also uses g.p.s. slights to track the trains movements to prevent accidents. if a train is going too fast for a speed limit in a given area, a computer would warn the operator and if the operator does not slow down, then the computer itself will initiate the brakes and slow the train down itself. >> to be clear, we're not sure yet if it was the operator error
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or faulty brakes in this case. do any railroads have this technology already? >> amtrak has it in place for some routes. the n.t.a. has a plan in place to implement the system but it's costly and going to take longer for them to kind of get it going and up and running. >> we should point out this is not the first time a train has derailed by negotiate thank dangerous curve in the bronx. in july, it happened to a freight train hauling trash. ten cars derailed, damaging 15 feet of track. coming up, we'll hear from ntsb member in charge of the investigation. >> tensions have cooled in thailand. crowds swarmed the government house compound in bangkok after the government ordered police to stand down when confronted by protestors. this caps 10 days of
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anti-government demonstrations that sometimes turn violent. opposition leaders want the prime minister to resign. >> opposition leaders criticized the government in a parliament session that got rowdy. the government is apologizing as protests intensify in key every. the prime minister regrets the us of police force against demonstrators. several were injured. protestors want the president to quit because he blocked a deal calling for closer ties with the european union. secretary of state john kerry is skipping his scheduled trip to the country, the white house saying the u.s. is unhappy with ukraines decision to distance itself from the e.u. >> the u.n. says there is overwhelming evidence that syria's president is guilty of war crimes. its human rights chief found
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bashar al assad and other senior government officials authorized attacks. >> the facts point to the commission of very serious crimes, war crimes, crimes against humanity. they point to the fact that the evidence indicates responsibility at the highest level of government, including the head of states. >> investigators say the system take nature of human rights abuses in syria points to government policy. this is the first tile the u.n. has directly implicated the syrian president. more than 100,000 people have been killed in the conflict. >> secretary of state john kerry is meeting with nato foreign affairs ministers in brussels to discuss security in afghanistan. the nato combat mission ends in 2014. delaying the security deal could endanger millions of dollars in
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aid and foreign investments. >> now that healthcare.gov is running smoothly, the obama administration is back in sales mode, kicking off a campaign today to promote the affordable care act. the white house wants to point out the benefits of the law, planning to focus on a specific benefit each day. >> president obama promises that america will maintain its leader ship in the search for an aids cure. the president spoke to researchers and government health officials marking world aids day. >> president obama said $100 million will be redirected to a national institute of health project to fight aids. he also said that starting next month, under the health reform law, h.i.v. positive americans cannot be denied insurance coverage. >> it is decision day for detroit. in a few hours, a federal judge is expected to rule whether the city is eligible for bankruptcy
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protection. it's the largest municipal bankruptcy filing in u.s. history. we are joined from detroit. this isn't just about detroit's finances, this could hit some long time residents hard, this bankruptcy. >> good morning. yes, that's right. there are a lot of retirees who worked for the city at some point who are on edge this morning. i have talked to legal analysts and they all strongly believe that the judge in this case is going to approve this bankruptcy. is a mentioned, the retirees are on edge and that's because at this point, they have so much to lose. >> bankruptcy is a term that none of us ever wanted to get to this point. >> facing a staggering $18 billion in long term debt,
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it was made clear that everything from the city's assets, like masterpieces at the detroit institute of art to retiree pensions may be up for grabs. >> to me, that's robbery. >> donald smith is one of some 20,000 retirees worried abing a husbandly awaiting the judge's decision. >> i'm not asking them to give me anything but what i earned. >> supply worked nearly 30 years as a city detention officer. he's concerned his $800 pension check could be stripped away or reduced, making hard times even worse. >> there are days i have to make up my mind whether i'm going to eat. that's just wrong. >> pension funds, which are three and a half billion dollars in the red of protected by the state constitution. it's an argument they hope the
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federal judge will understand in his ruling. municipal bankruptcy expert doug bernstein. >> well, part of the problem is whether it's pensioners or any other creditors, the pot is only so big to go around. >> a federal judge rules in favor of chapter nine protection. the city's mounting debt and obligations owed to tens of thousands of creditors would be droppedly reduced. if he rules against bankruptcy. >> we're going back to square one in chaos with a variety of lawsuits. you're going to see different creditors potentially trying to grab whatever they can get in order to satisfactory both of them. >> if detroit is declared bankrupt, i am told that the emergency planner plans to have a reorganization plan to the judge by the end of this month, setting the stage for the next phase of legal battles between the city and its creditors who are expected to appeal. back to you. >> an important day in detroit.
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thanks, bisi. >> cold temperatures and wintery conditions continue to blast the west and the system is making its way east. for more, let's bring in nicole mitchell. that. >> we have been commenting behind the scenes. it's cold in detroit. what i was saying is it's already cold, but going downhill fast. by the end of the week, some places, today is going to feel like a heatwave. the cold air will keep israeling into canada. already though with this system, a lot of areas seeing snow, the winds are picking up especially in the dakotas already. that has made some wind chill's right around the zero mark. it's blowing the snow across the roads, so that's going to be a problem for us. that's why so much of the northern midwest, northern plains, we have winter storm warnings up.
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some places could be seen, well over a foot, possibly closer to two feet of snow. that's going to be some serious shoveling today into tomorrow. once we add up all of those areas of accumulation. now, this is on the move. as i said, that colder air will justify continue to shoot southward. ahead of that, we've had warm stuff going by the wayside, as all of that does that, some of those wind chills already as i said feeling like single digits, some of the wind chills will drop to 40 below by friday and saturday morning in places like the dakotas. back to you guys. >> that wind does not help. nicole mitchell, thank you. >> a connecticut prosecutor will no longer fight to withhold the sandy hook emergency calls. the state wanted to protect survivors of the shooting and loved ones of the 26 victims. the town of newtown said the tapes will be released on wednesday. >> finding a cause for the new
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york city train accident. >> officials say speed played a role in the derailment. >> we're talking with national transportation safety board member earl wiener about the investigation and whether the high speed of the train was the result of human error or mechanical failure. >> vice president joe biden looking to ease tensions over a territorial dispute between japan and china. we'll take a closer look at the messages the vice president needs to bring to both sides. >> $2 billion, it's our big number of the day and it's giving retailers a big renato celebrate this holiday season.
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power of the people until we restore our tñ
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. >> we're talking with the leader of the ntsb investigation of the new york train deratement. >> first, let's look at what temperatures we he can speck to see across the nation today. meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> good morning. we've had dramatic changes with the next system coming in. billings is around single digits. temperatures will continue to go down through the course of the day. that will funnel cold air in the
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whole rest of the week. by the weekend, some of those temperatures will stay negative. ahead of that, we've had warm air for memphis today at 66, possibly in the 70's tomorrow. with that cold air friday, saturday morning, could actually be really deadly to be outside for any period of time with wind chills possibly 40 below zero. back to you. >> nicole, thank you. >> as we've reported, investigators say excessive speed played a role in sunday's deadly train derailment. information from two data recorders indicates the train was traveling 82 miles an hour, moments before it reached a curve and went off the rails. that's almost three times the speed limit for that stretch of track. >> reviewing the ntsb evidence could take 10 days.
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at last update, we knew the train was traveling faster than it should have. where does the investigation go from here. >> well, the investigation of course continues. this is only our second full day on scene. we'll continue to peruse the data off of the event recorders. we'll spend time in the train yards doing a further inspection of the cars and locomotive. we've just completed tests of the signaling system. we hope to continue interviews with the train crew members today. >> so, mr. wiener, as we've reported, speed definitely appears to be a factor. how do you determine if the speed was driven by human error or mechanical failure?
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>> it will take us time to determine that. we'll be looking at the cars, understanding how the braking performance of the cars was. the interviews with the train crew members of course will be very helpful. >> as we mentioned, the train was traveling at a speed of excess of 80 plus miles an hour. i want to talk about the brake pressure, it was at zero during the crash. does that tell us if it was human error or mechanical problem? >> it really doesn't. the way the brakes work on a train, if there's no pressure, the brake shoes or cap pes engaged completely. the brakes then are released by having pressure. that pressure could be the decrease in pressure could have been caused by actuation of a valve or because the train broke up. at this point, we don't know
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which one it is. >> a few transport experts have been talking about the technology. what do you know about whether something may have prevented this accident? >> i believe you're referring to positive train control, which is a technical name for a system that prevents trains from occupying the same set of tracks. it does provide signals for the train to slow. we don't know if that would have made a difference in this accident. we'll certainly be looking at that. the ntsb has been a long time train advocate of positive train control throughout the u.s. >> this particular train was being pushed versus pulled. does that play a factor at all in looking at what caused this crash? >> no, it really doesn't.
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push configuration or a pull configuration, either can be operated safely. it's not an unusual configuration. the control was still from the front of the train which in this case was a cab car. >> how broad is your organization's investigation? will it at some point look at the safety policies, the organizational structure, those issues down the line? >> yes. we look at all aspects, so we'll be looking at the mechanical equipment, the operation of the equipment, the way safety is managed within metro north and south, so we, this is a very comprehensive investigation. it will continue long after we leave the scene in 10 days. >> can you talk about the process moving forward once again over the course of 10 days, and once you have finished
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your all right, where it goes from there. >> at the molt, our focus is on understanding and gathering all the perishable evidence we can. once we finish that on scene and that will be a week to 10 days, then we will continue fact gathering back in the headquarters in washington, d.c. we'll follow that by analysis of the data that we've gathered. we will draw conclusions from that, findings, come up with a probable cause, and then the real value is to develop the recommendations that if complied with would have prevented this or similar sort of accidents. that whole process takes at least a year. >> i know you have a lot of work ahead. we certainly do appreciate your time. thank you. auto makers start rolling out monthly sales physician today in november, expected to be a strong month with new vehicle
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sales coming in at $15 million. one industry analyst says a couple of factors have been driving demand. >> you know, we've got an average vehicle age of 11.4 years within the u.s. fleet, so there's a lot of people moving from a scenario where they would like to replace their vehicle to where they need to. you've got historically low interest rates and historically low credit driving those sales volumes. >> hyundai sales rose 5%. >> volvo is joining the race to develop self driving cars, aiming to start testing the vehicles by 2017 in the swede inbound city where it's faced. it is backed by the government. the cars max out at 43 miles an hour. they will be the first driveless
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vehicles available to the public. >> wall street's winning streak seems to be on hold, investors concerned that the federal reserve may soon scale back its stimulus program. >> overseas, european markets taking their key from wall street and are training lower for the third straight day. japan hit a six year high as the weakerian helped companies, but the rest of the region did and the day mixed. >> the federal deposit insurance corporation says just 6900 federally insured institutions existed in the u.s. in the third quarter. the wall street journal reports at the peak, the u.s. had 18,000 banks. the decline has come mostly from the closing or consolidation of
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smaller banks. >> it's a familiar dilemma for developing countries, the choice between economic growth and protecting the environment. in our second report on the tanning industry, we look at whether environmental laws are enforced. >> blood red and loaded with coxic chemicals, tainted water gushes from one of the taken tanners in the district. they produce huge amounts of waste, full of cancer-causing chemicals. the water drains straight into the streams and open sewers of this dentally populated neighborhood, home to 160,000 people. streets and alleys are piled high with cost off leather trimmings, bones and rotting animal parts. >> if you wanted to know how hell looks like, you don't really wait to go to the hell. if you come to the tannery and
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have a look at the tannery area, that should tell you. >> scientists say the river is a dead zone, aquatic life can't exist there any longer. >> a new report just put out by a group of european and environmental watchdog organizations. one of the five most polluted places on the planet. >> leather is one of bangladesh's most valuable export commodities. human rights organization found no attempt by authorities to crack down on polluting tanneries. it calls it an enforcement-free zone. >> i haven't heard of a single
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case where the department of environment has been regular in visiting the tannery area. that this is because the government wants only to buy the argument of earning foreign exports. i would say this is a case of total absence of government. >> muhammed has lived here for years. >> the government doesn't understand. that if they did, we wouldn't be living in this filth. >> he blames toxic waste for his dear's death to cancer. >> i tried to save her, but i couldn't do anything. it's because of this place. >> no in-oh depth health studies have been done on the people living here, but they don't need reports or statistics to tell them they're living on poisoned land. >> each year, 14 million rawhides are processed into leather.
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that is exported to top fashion labels in dozens of countries. italy is the largest importer, spending about $85 million this year on the leather. >> smoothing over growing techies. joe biden is looking to defuse the situation between japan and china. >> we're talking about how his visit to japan could impact asia. >> the legal rights of frequent flyers. >> racial profiling, the claim one employer is making against a florida police department after his employee has been stopped more than 200 times. >> in sports, the seattle seahawks are flying high, especially russell wilson. the kid outplayed drew brees, sending a message to the entire nfl. we'll explain unjust a bit. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the
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only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be at hand and just in the nick of time. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country. >> only on al jazeera america. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's
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not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. (vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news.
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>> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> investigators are getting a better handle on what might have been behind that deadly train accident in the bronx in new york. we just spoke with the ntsb's earl wiener. in a moment, we'll look at a technological piece of equipment that might have prevented the accident. >> we know the train has been going taft. vice president that biden is in japan, working to smooth tensions between that country and the china, complain in a claiming rights over the islands in the east china sea and the japan doing the say. we've seen war a words and military planes flying over thized. coming up, we talk with an expert on the region on what the vice president will be able to accomplish during his time overseas. >> imagine being stopped by the
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police more than 200 times. this is what happened to one florida man. he's been dealing with this for the last four years and now his employer wants to take action over what he says amount to say able profiling. we'll have that story coming up, too. >> data recorders show that a commuter train was traveling 82 miles an hour just moments before it derailed. it is almost three times the speed limit for the curved section of track where the train derailed just outside new york city. right now, workers are using heavy equipment to lift the trains back on the track. once finished, transit workers will begin to make repairs on the track. >> the derailment is bringing new attention to improve safety. a new system is supposed to be in place within two years, but some r. companies want to push back that deadline. >> in july, a freight train with a load of oil derailed in
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quebec. the resulting fire and explosion killed at least 42 and leveled more than 30 buildings in the town center. in this country, 75,000 car loads of breathable paysen, such as every day chlorine move over our tracks each year. 24 were killed in a crash. a so-called positive control system must be in place that carry passengers or chemicals that are toxic oh inhale. with two years to go, positive control is only seeing spotty implementation. >> here in san francisco, the rail system is manually operated while the trains are above ground, allowing the human driver to adjust if there is a double parked car or dog in the street. once these traipse go blow ground, a positive control system snaps into action, monitoring the drivers, making sure they are not distracted or
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incapacitated. if they are, the system can slow or stop these trains. >> could positive control have helped prevent the new york derailment? possibly. here's how. it would add g.p.s. satellites, a centralized control system and remote control that could slow or stop a train, like the dangerous speeds now detected in the new york accident. however, the system is difficult and expensive to implement, and r.s have said that they're not going to make their 2015 deadline. at the moment, trains operate via manual control and a simple system of communications. >> metro north is in the process of installing the federally mandated positive control system, but it was not in place at the time. >> airline frequent flier programs on the docket, you can get free trips, but it's unclear
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if frequent flyers have legal rights when there is a dispute. the court must decide if frequent flyers can sue. the customer's suing northwest airlines because he was dropped from the frequent flier program for complaining too much. he called to complain 24 times. >> vice president joe biden is trying to calm the territorial dispute between japan and china, saying the u.s. will stay committed and washington is deeply concerned about the east china sea dispute. >> the prospect from this calculation mistake is too high. >> china and japan both claims a group of islands in the east china sea. china declared an air defense zone over the area. mr. biden said he will raise the concerns over the risk of miscalculation with chinese leaders in a few days. >>downing us to discuss the
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challenges vice president joe biden is facing on his mission to asia is a fellow with the asia program at the marshall fund in the u.s., a public policy think tank dedicated to transatlantic relations. thank you for joining us. the focus of these talks really dominated by this new air defense zone that china has set up, those islands are disputed between china and japan. what method does mr. biden need to bring. >> there's a difficult balance for the united states to strike on these issues. it's running into them with china again and again. in this instance, what he has to do is both reassure allies in the region without leading them to take risks that could drag the u.s. into conflict. he has to deter china from coercing its neighbors without damaging what is a hugely
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bilateral relationship between the u.s. and china. china's been increasingly assertive making these claims and trying to extend it's authority in the region. in this in to answer, there's been a sense that heave handled this issue particularly badly. there's been a real over reach on their part, so what you've seen from the u.s. side whether militarily flying the b52 bombers over the air defense zone or retoreically is there needed to be a bit of push back on the issue. it may have cow the chinese by surprise. >> speaking of those american b52's, floor over that air space, is this just a dispute between china and japan or does the u.s. have strategic interests at play? >> the u.s. direct strategic
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interests in play is they use militarily as wellle some of its international tear space, too. the broader issue is about china's attempts to expand in the area. there's a pattern of behavior there that is leading countries in the region to be in a state of considerable unease about what the long term agenda on china's part is and they're looking to the u.s. to step in and play a role in upholding some of the norms of sovereignty and rights of navigation that have been present in the region for decades. >> which the u.s. seems poised to do. the u.s. military has discussed this pivot to the specific, focusing more military assets on this area of the world.
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do you think we'll see a renewed on that based on this more assertive stance by china. >> in the first term, i think you've seen the administration demonstrating the taking onboard the message that come to them from a lot of asian countries, the 80% of success was just showing up. in the second term, with obama missing the asia summit with john kerry absorbed in the in the middle east, the question that washington will devote to the region has certainly been there. the recent speeches by the administration and visit by the vice president being a recommitment and underscoring of the fact that the rebalancing is still on in obama's second term, but the test that have is really going to be not just the
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rhetorickiccal commitment to oh it. >> a court appearance is set for the suspect understand deadly airport shooting last month. he faces a murder charge in the death of a t.s.a. officer. three others were injured. if convicted, he could be give the death penalty or life in prison without parole. he is held without bail. >> in new orleans, jury selection resumes this morning in the retrial of a former police officer. david warren was convicted of fatally shooting a man just after hurricane katrina, serving a prison term of nearly 26 years for manslaughter. a federal judge overturned the conviction. >> a miami herald investigation
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found that the police department racially profiled employees of one convenience store. we take a closer look at one man who's been searched more than 100 times. >> this is the first arrest of earl sampson caught on video by his boss in the speak of 2012. he was stocking soda at the quick stop. you can see a police officer come inside and arrest him while at the store. police call the area a hot spot for crime, known for drugs and loitering. they don't buy that sampson is actually an employee. he was charged with trespassing and spent that night in jail. he says while he does have a small rap sheet, he's never committed a felony. yet he says in the last four years, the police officers have stopped him 258 times for petty crimes such as trespassing and loitering and arrested him 62 times, often while doing what he says is his job. >> it's crazy.
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like i ain't even no human no more, like i'm just an animal. >> his boss is fed up, saying the police department is involved in racial profiling of cam son and his customers and his store subjected to unlawful searches. he installed cameras not only to keep an eye on activity, but police. >> it's sad, the way the police officer was acting for this community was really sad. >> miami gardens police chief won't say much about sampson's case, due to the pending civil rights lawsuit filed against his department. the department has conducted it's own investigation since last year. the chief says the department uses data, not profiling, to fight crime. >> you got a black chief, african-american chief,
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african-american mayor, african-american city manager. that does not make sense. a predominantly trick american city, i know the department didn't do anything wrong. >> it's an aggressive policing approach, focusing on small crime like trespassing to prevent bigger ones. the department's zero tolerance policing program is effective. miami gardens was the 15t 15th most violent city of its size, last year dropped to the 40th. >> police must take con terrence about racial profiling seriously or lose local trust i don't by abusing the rights of so many people systematically, you alienate communities and this is a breeding ground for crime. >> dis enchanted, sampson now
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looks at the police as a potential jailer, not a protector. >> they have spent about $20,000 obtain documents that show police and city leaders violated the rights of its citizens.
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>> the devin very head coach is happy to be back as the broncos get ready to make the playoff push. >> i'm doing great, happy to be back. i told there's a lot to be
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grateful for, great job in a very tough quarter, finishing 3-1, so, you know, it's a tribute to all the hard work that went on in this building and very proud. >> all right, ever since losing derrick rose for the season, the chicago bulls have dropped five of the last six games. coincidence? i think not. the bulls hosting the pel pelic. bulls nursing a lead, with 10 seconds left, gordon from three-point land, we are heading to dowell overtime. luol deng ties it up and we are heading to triple overtime. are are you serious? tied at 122? chicago had one last chance. quadruple overtime, no way. pelicans pick up the victory in triple overtime.
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it was a barn burner. >> yeah, that's a high scoring game. >> we want to go to bed. >> thank you. >> giving hope after losing a piece of oneself. >> the warning after a case of the first human case of the deadly bird flu. >> areunion that one family thought would not happen.
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>> and now a techknow minute...
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>> in afghanistan, working to give those who lost limbs help. >> the next system will bring all of the cold air in. you can see from montana moving
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into wisconsin, michigan is going to be a widespread area of snow, especially the dakotas into minnesota, places seeing over a foot over the next couple days as this accumulates. a foot and a half, isolated spots, even more, this will be blowing with all the wind associated with it. widespread dense fog is going to make you the difficult to drive. we have lighter blues in here for winter storm watches. that's because as all of this moves so you hadward, we could be dealing with with freezing precipitation into thursday, friday, so a lot to watch with this next system. back to you. >> hong kong confirmed its first human case of a new strain of bird flu. a third 60-year-old woman is in critical condition. it is believed she contracted the disease by handling poultry. four people she had contact with
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are showing flu symptoms, as well. 139 cases have been confirmed across china, including 45 deaths since april. >> afghanistan is the world's most dangerous pleas for relief workers according to a new report that finds attacks on aid workers tripled this year. 36 have been killed, 46 injured this year. the taliban has taken responsibility for many attacks. >> around 1 billion people in the world live with a disability. many face challenges and participate in a lot of areas of society, including the workforce. a center in afghanistan is providing a lifeline to the disabled there. jane ferguson has details from kabul. >> few people understand the value of a prosthetic leg as much as muhammed. when he was three years old, he played with something shiny. it was a bomb. when it exploded, it took both his legs at times hip.
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he now works at the international committee of the red cross center in kabul, making prosthetic limbs for other afghans. >> i'm disabled making legs for other people. i'm proud of it. >> he is part of an exclusive workforce. >> it could be easy to imagine the atmosphere here as depressing, but in fact, this is an incredibly positive place in part because most of the staff here are themselves physically disabled, proving to the patients that they can live positive, functional lives. >> the center provides treatments for thousands of disabled afghans. some have lost limbs during years of war, other the accidents of genetic disease. in a country where the able bodied struggle, staff make sure
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the disabled don't as you have even more. >> finding a job, finding money for the house, for everything. if you are a disabled person. you have much less chances that a person without disabilities. >> the government doesn't off much help. this is a main public hospital. it has 17 permanent beds for people who are paralyzed. in a cramped, dirty space offering little treatment. the facility may not house every disabled afghan who needs it, but its work is still a lifeline for these people, who have a strong spirit in spite of devastating injuries. jane ferguson, aljazeera, kabul, afghanistan. >> the red cross began its efforts to provide prosthetic limbs in afghanistan 25 years ago during that time, more than
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57,000 patients have entered the center. >> a daughter thought her 78-year-old mother had been killed by typhoon haiyan, watching helplessly from miles away. the daughter made her way to the philippines this week and found her mother. the elderly woman survived by clinging to a door frame. >> is to are given to law enforcement groups, and charities to hand out during the holidays. the inmates kraut an estimated 5,000 toys each year. >> we have a look at what we're following in our second hour. >> the train that derailed in new york city was traveling 82 miles an hour when it went off the tracks. the ntsb is investigating the cause. >> a judge will make a key decision on the detroit
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bankruptcy case, ruling if the chapter nine filing can move forward. >> crowds have swarmed a government compound in thailand after police lifted barricades. >> the holiday season is in full swing, charities looking to follow up on the spending with a little giving. we'll learn more about the giving tuesday campaign and how its using technology to spread its message. >> an epic finish in college basketball. we'll have the sights and sounds in just a bit. >> i'm meteorologist nicole mitchell. a brutal storm system is bricking everything from snow to plummeting temperatures. i'll have the nothing forecast. >> aljazeera continues in two and a half minutes. stay with us.
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>> this isn't a new channel, this is a watershed moment in media for america. >> this entire region is utterly devastated. >> people our here are struggling. >> the fire jumped the highway we took earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch high quality journalism, period.
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>> al jazeera america is a straight-forward news channel. >> its the most exciting thing to happen to american journalism in decades. >> we believe in digging deep. >> its unbiased, fact-based, in-depth journalism. >> you give them the facts, dispense with the fluff and get straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news.
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>> a monumental ruling for the motor city, a judge will decide if detroit can go into bankruptcy. >> excessive speed maybe to blame for sending a commuter train off the rails. a train was going nearly three times faster than it should have been. >> resignation rejected, thailand's prime minister is refusing to step down as anti-government protestors storm her office building. >> instead of spending money on black friday and cyber monday, thousands of charities promoting giving tuesday, a way to help those in need.
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. a crucial decision about the future of detroit is expected in a few hours. the federal judge is due to announce whether detroit is eligible for bankruptcy protection. this is the largest sum bankruptcy filing in u.s. history. detroit is about $18 billion in debt. the crime rate in michigan's largest city the is five times the national average, but bankruptcy won't help many city residents. it could defund $3.5 billion in pensions. we are joined from detroit. this ruling really could hit some residents there spread hard. pretty hard. >> there are a lot of city retiree's right now on edge. i have spoken with quite a few legal experts and all strongly
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believe that the judge will approve this bankruptcy. what happens after that is unclear, but one thing that is certain is that these retirees are nervous, very worried, because they have so much to lose. >> after four months of court hearings, a federal judge will rule on whether detroit is eligible for chapter nine bankruptcy. >> bankruptcy is a term that none of us ever want to get to this point. >> facing a staggering $18 billion in long term debt, the city manager made it clear that everything like art masterpieces to retiree pensions may be up for grabs. >> to me, that's robbery. >> donald smith is one of 20,000 retirees worried, anxiously awaiting the judge's decision.
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>> i'm not asking them to give me anything but what i earned. >> smith worked nearly 30 years as a city detention officer. he's concerned his $800 pension check could be stripped away or reduced, making hard times even worse. >> there are days i to have make up my mind whether i'm going to eat or get some medicine. >> retirees believe the pension funds, which are $3.5 billion in the red are protected by the state constitution. it's an argument they hope the federal judge will understand in his ruling. municipal bankruptcy expert doug bernstein. >> part of the problem is whether it's pensioners or any other creditors, the pot is only so big to go around. >> obligations owed to tens of thousands of creditors would be dramatically reduced.
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if he rules against bankruptcy. >> we're going back to square one with chaos, a variety of lawsuits. you are going to see creditors trying to grab whatever they can get in order to satisfactory debts owed to them. >> if detroit is declared bankrupt, a restructuring plan will be put before the judge within the month. creditors are expected to appeal. >> some of the key factors that drove detroit to file for bankruptcy, the city is on the who can off retiree health care. we fits and $3.5 billion in pension contributions. one paid $30 billion in bonuses from 1985 to 2007.
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>> 82 miles an hour is how fast federal investigators say a commuter train was traveling just before it derailed sunday in new york city. the train was heading into a curve and should have been going 30 miles an hour. crews are working to clear the crash site. they've used heavy equipment to turn the derailed train cars upright. after that, they will begin track rares. we have the latest on the investigation. >> we just heard from the head of the investigation for the ntsb a little while ago and he said investigators will continue to analyze a crash scene today as they sift through the train wreck that killed other people. one of the goals today is to interview the rest of the train crew as they try to figure out what went wrong. >> it will take us some time to conclusively analyze that. we will make sure they
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understand how the braking performance of the cars was. the interviews with the train crew members of course will be very helpful. >> those crew interviews today may help determine how the train derailed after taking this turn at nearly three times the speed limit. >> the train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30-mile an hour usual. >> that's according to the ntsb after analyzing the train's data recorders. >> when i heard about the speed, i gulped. it sort of takes your breath away. >> another revelation, the brakes were not applied until six seconds before the train derailed, throwing all seven of its cars off the tracks, sending one dangerously close to the hudson river's edge. investigators are looking to see if the brakes failed, although they say the train made several stops along the route just before the wreck. as crews work through the night clearing twisted metal and
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righting flipped train cars, investigators are trying to figure out the cause of the crash and whether human error was a factor. the train's engineer is under serious you scrutiny to see if he was distracted or sleeping as the train went well past the 70-mile an hour speed limit even before it hit the turn. >> we certainly will be looking at the cell phone. we found distraction to be an issue in some accidents, but not all accidents by any means. >> the engineer has been tested for drugs and alcohol, but the results are not reds. rockefeller will face more questions wednesday. family members who lost loved once gathered near the crash site to remember the four people who died, including jim lovell on his way to work. >> it's so sad he's gone. >> another beloved father and
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husband taken from his family too soon. >> he's never back. never. >> answers for family members will not come quickly. the ntsb will be on site for another week, but a final report could take as long as a year. the rail cars and locomotive will be moved to a secure location for a more detailed examination. stephanie. >>er da, thank you. the derailment sunday is the third metro north incident to be investigated. the agency has been looking into metro north's safety features. on may 17, more than 70 people were injured when a metro north train derailed in connecticut and was struck by another train. less than two weeks later on may 28, a track foreman was killed in an accident at a metro north station under construction in west haven, connecticut. >> the northern plains and northern midwest are dealing with very cold temperatures. it's about to get worse.
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let's bring unmeteorologist nicole mitchell. >> the bottom is basically about to fall out on these temperatures. we have a potent cold front coming through. that's already the reason behind snow in some areas, ice in the northern midwest. ahead of that, warm air, but with the temperatures dropping down, that's sad rated air, so fog justify ahead of where all of this is going on from illinois into texas or louisiana. as we put this into motion. you can see northern parts of minnesota under snow for the last 12 hours, already some of the city. that is going to stay in place with chances through the day tomorrow until the system clears out. after it clears out, we start to see the cold air come in. in the meantime, some areas in the darker blue, you see a foot or more, including the arrowhead of minnesota, which accounted see up to two feet of snow.
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saturday morning could be deadly if you're out for any period of time, because wind chills will be 30 and 40 below. i'll have more on that in a few minutes. >> the u.s. is talking with allies about maintaining security in afghanistan. afghanistans president refuse to say sign a deal that would keep u.s. and nato troops there after 2014. analysts say delaying the deal could he danger aid and foreign investment in afghanistan. >> vice president joe biden is trying to calm the territorial dispute between japan and china.
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biden told japanese leaders that the u.s. will stay committed to their alliance and that washington is deally concerned about the east china sea dispute. >> the prospect for miscalculation mistake is too high. >> china and japan both claim a group of islands in the east china sea. tensions rose when china declared an air defense zone over the area. biden will raise concerns about the miscalculation with chinese leaders. >> four people are dead after a bombing in syria. a suicide bomber triggered the explosion near a government building in damascus. 17 as heries were injured. meanwhile, a nun in a predominantly christian village said opposition fighters abducted 12 nuns. the fate of the in my opinions is unknown. >> there is disagreement about
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why iran agreed to the concessions. we report from the state department. >> hand shakes, smiles, a deal. the international community recently celebrated an agreement to oh ensure iran's nuclear program stays peaceful. now the iranian foreign minister tells aljazeera his country struck the deal because it wanted to, not because of u.s.-led economic sanctions. >> when sanctions started, iran had less contributes.
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contribute--centrifuges. >> the sanctions were a driving factor in bringing the iranians back to the negotiating table i. >> washington and tehran might cooperate on other matters, including sir you i can't if this agreement succeeds. iran, which supports the bashar al assad regime could be useful at the upcoming peace talks. >> the whole goal is to create a transitioning government body. that's the goal of the geneva conference. the comments come in the middle of what could be described as a charm offensive, visiting officials in arab countries, which have sent guns and cash to the syrian opposition.
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all of us need to cooperate with each other to in fact contain the threat of sectarian divide in the region. >> nothing said is new, but the iranian government's asserting itself is being studied closely. >> a group of senators is working on a bill calling for more sanctions if iran doesn't live up to a deal. the white house worries that the plan could hurt the current agreement. >> the u.s. said there is overwhelming evidence that sir you i can't's president is guilty of war crimes, saying that bashar al assad and other senior government officials authorized attacks. >> point to the commission of very serious crimes, war crimes, crimes against humidity. they point to the fact that the
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evidence indicates responsibility at the highest level of government, including the head of state. attacks on aid workers tripled this year. >> the obama administration is back in sales mode for the affordable care act. the white house wants to pointed out the benefits of the law. the administration plans to focus on a specific benefit each day until the sign-up deadline
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on december 20 throw. that's when anyone who wants their medical coverage to begin january 1 must be enrolled. >> protestors overrun a government compound in thailand. >> why police lifted the barricade to say let them in. >> thousands of demonstrators remain defiant in key every. we'll look at how the battle of east versus west is playing a role in the ukraine uprising.
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>> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy you. up next, protestors swarm a government compound in thailand while rallies in ukraine prompt the president to take action. first let's look at temperatures across the nation today. >> toward the northern tier, this morning in the teens and falling, expected to keep falling into the single digits
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through the day. ahead of the front, we've got 50's and 60's that could go into the 70's, possibly even a couple of isolated spots in the 80's. as the front comes through, definitely divides between warmer to know average and much colder than average as all this goes on. the northern plains is where we'll see temperatures drop. as it goes through, temperatures will not only fall into single digits in some cases, but continue to fall through into the weekend. which means with winds, we'll have those extreme wind chills. back to you. >> nicole, thank you. >> tensions have cooled in thailand. crowds swarmed the government compound in dang cock after the government ordered police so stand down when confronted by protestors. this capped 10 days of demonstrations. they want the prime minister to
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resign among other things. with crowds taking over the government house today, can you tell us what the situation is like right now? >> that was several hours ago. right now, the situation is very calm. the police barricades were brought down. that's the first time we've seen any kind of retreat by law enforcement on the streets of bangkok in this 10 day anti anti-government pro testify. there was a back down. we were hearing there was a truce made mainly because of the king's birthday. it is on thursday, so both sides agreed to step back. they took down barricades, removed the razor wire and protestors were allowed into the complex of the headquarters for
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the metropolitan police and government houses where the prime minister that offices. they went into the court yards in front of the buildings, the lawns in front of the buildings, stayed there for about an hour or two and then left. it was a very symbolic thing that they were allowed to get into these areas, something the anti-government protest leader that said that he wanted to do. he wanted to take over those two facilities. that did not happen, but they were allowed on to the lawn, if they will. in the one case, the government had a big lunch there and left. the full victory is the prime minister resigning, she said she is not going to do that. the protestors will have a sit in until their goals are met. truce at least on friday, of a the king's birthday.
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>> thank you. >> heated emotions in the ukrainian parliament today as a no confidence vote fails. opposition leaders criticized the government during a rowdy parliament session. meanwhile, the government is apologizing as protests intensify in key every. the prime minister says the government regrets the use of police force against demonstrators over the weekend. several people were injured in the capitol. protestors want the president to quit because he blocked a deal calling for closer ties with the european union. >> the government should resign, because it is not fulfilling its duties. they only make promises, but don't do anything. >> secretary of state john kerry is skipping his scheduled trip to the country. the white house says the u.s. is unhappy with ukraines decision to distance itself from the e.u. joining us now for a closer look at what's driving the protests in ukraine is a researcher of
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european studies. thanks for joining us. a lot of breaking developments this morning. >> good morning, thank you. >> a vote of no confidence in the ukrainian government failed in parliament. what does this mean for the president and these protestors? >> for the protest, it means that they will have to do more to achieve their rates. as far as i understand, and as far as i read from the internet. the protestors are now trying to block the governmental buildings in order to convince the government to resign, and in order to convince president to resign, as well. >> i wonder whether the u.s. has any leverage when it comes to high level snubs.
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>> well, the fact that as herry will not be traveling to ukraine is actually a good sign. the u.s. does have the leverage and it does have influence. it will be better now and i think the protestors would also support the idea of isolating ukraine, and telling the ukrainian government the that they will be isolated even more on the west. prime minister is also threatening the protestors with more violence, and basically the government is now, its support base is only the authorized
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police. they don't really have support from the people. >> they have support in parliament, though, sir. that no confidence vote failed today. >> they have the majority in the parliament, but they don't have the support of the people. >> aren't there people in the eastern part of the country that would disagree with that, people that want to be closer to moscow? >> some people do want to be closer to moscow, but signing the agreement is not turn away from the moscow. it's not something that will change the situation in ukraine in terms of personal or business links with russia. >> ukraineens at this point seem to want more than this signing of the trade agreement. what are they fighting for now, in your view? >> originally, these pro
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testifies were about the signing of the agreement, but everything changed overnight from friday to saturday, and early in the morning on saturday, the riot police violently suppressed the peaceful demonstrations. then the protests were joined by people. they were quite neutral about the signinging of the agreement, but very disappointed and very shocked about the government's violence against the protestors. >> people calling this the largest protest, even maybe larger since the orange revolution. thanks for being with us this morning. >> the croation prime minister
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favors a bill that would give same sex couples many of the rights granted in marriage. >> cyber monday was big monday for retailers. research finds sales up you 19% from last year, a record. in the sign of changing times, mobile traffic made up one third of the site visits. >> two big winners are amazon and ebay. amazon sales jumped 47% as of monday morning, and ebay saw an increase of 21%. >> carmakers are releasing november sales figures today. we just got the numbers from chrysler. it's reporting u.s. sales jumped a solid 16%, the best monthly rise in six years. the new jeep cherokee helped up
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sales. one industry watcher talks about the case. >> i think that you need to remain disciplined as an you a toe maker when adding incentives to vehicles. it works well for the industry. >> november is expected to be a strong month for the auto industry with new vehicle sales coming in at more than $15 million. >> federal regulators are expanding oversight. the consumer protection bureau will be looking at non-bank companies that service the loans. the bureau already oversees banks that handle them. student debt totals more than a trillion dollars and 7 million borrowers are in default. >> it was an attack that stunned the dance world. >> a legal battle brewing over
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hospital he got things. taking aim at catholic bishops. >> a unique new way to give a special day charity takes special stage. >> the seattle seahawks have gone where no other team has gone this season. we'll explain why the team is flying high in just a bit.
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>> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be at hand and just in the nick of
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time. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country. >> only on al jazeera america. >> welcome back to aljazeera america. accident investigators say excessive speed played a role in the derailment of a commuter train, going more than 80 miles an hour heading for a curve where the speed limit is 30. earlier this morning, ntsb investigator said determining whether human error or was to blame may take time.
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>> gathering all the evidence that we can, once we finish that on scene, that will be a week to 10 days, then we will continue fact gathering back in the headquarters in washington, d.c. we will follow that by analysis of the data that we gathered. we will draw conclusions from that, findings, come up with a probably cause, and then the real value is to develop the recommendations that if complied with, would have prevented this or similar sort of accidents. that whole process takes at least a year. >> even before sunday's accident in the bronx, the ntsb was investigating metro north's safety standards after two accidents last may in connecticut. one was a derailment in bridgeport within the other a fatal accident involving a foreman in west haven. for more, let's bring in don phillips. he covered transportation for the washington post for more
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than 20 years and is currently a columnist joining us. you covered transportation accidents over the years. what are the red flags in this accident? >> i think the biggest red flag, and i have to be careful, because there is no certain cause yes, but the red flag here seems to be that human error just keeps popping up as the main possibility. >> human error apparently is the case in 40% of the accidents, although that hasn't been established yet here. >> no. >> the ntsb has been urging railroads to improve overall safety. >> it's gone very slowly.
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there are legitimate reasons why, but one of the reasons that these things go slowly is that there are many demands for the funds in other areas. that if you go for something like positive train control, you might not be able to buy that next set of equipment. >> that's a really important point, i think. meanwhile, newer trains, much like cars have been designed to hold up in the event of a crash. are there safety problems with the older trains and are we again talking about a financing problem? >> no. i don't think there is particular problems with the older trains. in fact, the older trains tend to be even tougher than current trains. what has happened in this particular case is 82 miles per hour in a 30-mile per hour zone, you cannot stay on the track, number one, and once you go off
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the track, you're going to have some hurt and unfortunately a few killed people. >> do you think that seatbelts or restraints of some kind would make a difference in a crash like this? >> no, i don't think so. >> the crash was the first in metro north's 30 year history to cause actual fatalities. are trains still the safest way to travel. >> yes. it's a horse race every year between trains and airplanes, because commercial airplanes have gotten extremely safe. passenger trains are extremely safe. you're talking about a very minor difference between the two, but they are, without question, the safest way to travel. >> circling back to the on going investigation, i know the two data recorder boxes, so called black boxes were recovered from the train. i didn't know train had black
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boxes. are they in airliners and record everything. >> pretty much so. they get better all the time. in this particular case, as i understand it, they do record the things that the investigators wonderful need to know. that's the important thing. there are so many questions here to that we don't know the and that is to. this train was speeding. it was going 82 miles per hour in a 70-mile per hour zone for, i don't know however coming into it. why was it doing that? that's sort of repair these days. for someone in r.ing to speed especially an experienced engineer like that, so that is just another thing that leads to the possibility that for some reason, he was not paying attention. >> thanks for joining us this
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morning. >> certainly. >> jury selection resumes in the retrial of a former new orleans police officer. david warren was convicted of fay ally convicting a man. the conviction was overturned, saying he was tried unfairly. >> two former police officers are on trial of the fate albeiting of a mentally ill man. that. [ screaming ] >> attorneys for the officers say they are wrongly accused, claiming the victim was combative. in an interview, thomas's father said his son was not violent. >> as person, he was always very well loved, very liked, a lot of friends. he loved to laugh, make people
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laugh, and the community itself in fullerton really loved him and he became a figure there. >> the charges include involuntary manslaughter and murder pap hearing for a third officer is scheduled late next month. >> it was a scandal that rocked one of the world's most renowned ballet troops. a judge handed down a verdict this morning declaring the man guilty in the january attack. aljazeera's peter sharp has more from moss you. >> it was a trial that revealed the deaths of the poisonous rivalries that lay at the heart of the countries most prestigious. sole list in the ballet was found guilty of an attack on his bitter rival, who i claimed and
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refused to he and his girlfriend any decent roles in upcoming productions. he was sentenced to six years. he was nearly blinded in the attack. he has had 20 operations to try to save his sight. he was not in court oh, but in germany undergoing treatment. the man who admitted throwing the the acid in the face of the director was found guilty and sentenced to 10 years in prison. the third man on trial, the driver, was given four years. all men are have said to have turned themselves into the attack. he said he ordered that he be roughed up but never sanctioned an acid attack on his rival. the trial has produced an endless flow of sensational disclosures about some of
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russia's most treasured ballet stars. they will serve out their sentences in a strict penal colony. fans of the ballet hope that from now on, russia's most loved cultural icon will be as much known for success on stage and not from the scandals and vicious gossip coming from the wins. aljazeera in moscow. >> the ballet is one of the world's oldest companies, founded as leaser for russian royalty. >> two roam map cluck diocese must reveal got it dent at this time of priests known to have molested children. the cases date back to the 1950's. some of the priests are now dead. an attorney for the alleged victims say the decision is a
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milestone, especially for those who have not come forward. >> survivors who are suffering alone in silence, thinking they're the only ones who were abused can now know they may not be alone. >> the amp diocese has until december 17 to make the names public. >> the american civil liberties union is suing the u.s. conference of catholic bishops, focusing on ethical guidelines imposed at church run hospitals. it cites the case of a woman not told that continuing her pregnancy posed grave risks to her health. the michigan woman went into early labor and her baby died within hours. the conference of bishops is not commenting on the case. >> a legal setback for internet retailers on perhaps the busiest on line shopping day of the year. on cyber monday, the u.s. supreme court refused to hear a case, meaning internet sellers
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must collect sales taxes just like in state businesses. amazon filed the challenge. other states might start taxing internet sales. amazon currently collects sales taxes for new york and 15 other states. >> you celebrated thanksgiving, shopped on black friday and went wild on line on cyber monday. charities hope you will commemorate giving tuesday, a a campaign to start a national day in giving and celebration of charitable activities. >> giving tuesday is global. together, we are creating a conversation about how each of us gives back. this tuesday, december 3, lead by example, and the world will follow. >> joining us to explain this movement is vice president of communications with the united nations foundation. he's in washington this morning. thanks for being with us and
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good morning. what exactly is giving tuesday? >> giving tuesday is a probably movement, a chance for people everywhere around the world to celebrate how they give back and for us to restart the giving season. as you said, we've got days for getting deals. we've been talking a lot about shopping. people in the united states of america and around the world, thousands of organizations have said let's kick off the giving season together by making sure how we give back is a part of the global conversation. >> where did the concept originate? >> the concept was born, i think quite puttingly at a kitchen table of a dear friend and inspirer of one of the founding partners of giving tuesday, who immediately said we should be talking to people, to our friends at facebook, at mash up. we should be discussing giving
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back. we said if there's been a about her time, this is it, let's go ahead and use this new media era to kick off the conversation around giving and the holidays. >> one of the things you're doing is telling people to take unselfies. >> selfy is a word a lot of people have talked about. what's happening with the unselfy is bigger. people around the world are saying to us, i want to take an unselfy. i want to take a picture of muscles showing what i do to give back tommy community, something that i'm advocating for. whether it's a small child and his mom taking a picture in front of a sign for a charity, or someone saying i'm going to help give back to disaster relief in the philippines, people everywhere, thousands of people are taking pictures of
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themselves and using the hash tag #unself-y. >> do you credit this so social media. >> the hash tag is there on purpose. we live in a time where people want to talk about what it means to give. that's something from the heart, it's inspiring. whether looking at google's home page and seeing giving tuesday there or on facebook or twitter, we believe that the success of giving tuesday is due in part to the fact that people can share ideas more easily than ever. it used to be just about checks, about something you could take out of your pocket, but now is about something you can do to inspire other people to get behind causes that matter to you and that can really maken
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impact. >> today is giving tuesday. thank you, sir. >> the charities and foundation has released its annual word giving index. the report found that when it comes to giving money to charities, the u.s. is the most generous nation in the world. it's followed by canada, burma, new zealand and ireland. while croatia and greece both hit hard in the global recession, round out the bottom of the list. >> ross shimabuku is here with sports. the seahawks made a statement against saints last night. good morning. >> good morning, stephanie. the seahawks made an unselfish state. seattle made a statement, a loud and clear one against the saints. set a fans were just loud. russell wilson was all smiles
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because his defensive back field is known as the legion of boom. here comes the boom, baby. michael bennett is off to the races. the big fella takes it 22 yards to the happy place as the seahawks getting their boogie on with a 10-0 league. wilson drives a strike from zack miller. over 68,000 fans are going absolutely bananas, because seattle up 17-0. >> in the second quarter, wilson continues to work his magic, finding a wide-open doug baldwin. this showdown turns out to be a blow out, people. seattle was just gettng tipsy. check out this drill here. it goes off the hands of davis. wilson threw for 310 yards and three touchdowns as seattle would spank the saints 34-7. seahawks punched their ticket into the playoffs. next up, secure that number one
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seat in the nfc and home court advantage. >> for us to come out in that fashion and win that game the way we did was pretty awful. just the fact that we were clicking on all cylinders. our crowd was unbelievable. they broke the world record again, so just the energy, you can really feel the ground shaking, so it makes a huge difference. >> the seahawks have the best record in the nfl. the portland trailblazers are sitting pretty on top of the western conference. portland had a tough test last night. can you say nba finals preview? >> portland took an 86-78 lead into the fourth quarter. the pacers would rally back. paul george was making it rain, wracking up a career high 43 points. pacers down by two. lillard seals the deal there.
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the pacer improve to 15-3 on the season. >> roller coaster ride, back and forth, florida takes the lead as michael trasher off the glass. gators up 64-63. yukon had one last chaps. pump up the volume. >> five seconds to go. lost the dribble, leans in, that's no good. back tap, for the win! he got it! >> oh, yeah. let the celebration begin. fires as improves to a perfect 8-0 on the season. steve sarkisian said hello to u.f.c., the degree honest.
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>> hiring. i. the interim coach quit after hearing the news. sarkisian turned around the huskies program with a 34-29 record in five seasons. hopefully, they can recab at your the magic. >> african elephants in danger. what's being down protect the majestic creatures from ivory poachers. >> numerous winter storm warnings up in place that have seen over 24 hours. i'll have the details in your forecast. ♪ ♪ >> love that movie, gene kelly's suit from this scene sold for $10 back in 1970. find out how much it is expected to hit when it hits the auction
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block this week. >> and now, a techknow minute...
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. just ahead, elephant undanger, why some say governments aren't doing enough to protect the animals. first, let's look at where the snow and rain may fall across the country today. nicole mitchell is back. >> we've had a lot of snow with this system. you can see the northern tier of this country. we are up at 26 or 27 hours. some parts of town, over a foot of snow already. the air ahead in minnesota, easily places that can get isolated up to two feet. as all of this moves southward, could be freezing rain within the next couple of days, as the system moves in and also watch out for that cold air. back to you. >> nicole, thank you. >> a deadly spark attack in hawaii, a man fishing in a kayak was bitten. he was dangling his foot in the
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water when the shark grabbed ahold of him. this is the second fatal shark attack in that area this year. >> elephants in africa are in extreme danger. there are concerns poachers killing the animals for their ivory could wipe them out. we have more about what's being down save the creatures sang waters like this one provide safety, but the trade in illegal ivory is lucrative. it's estimated there are fewer than half a million elephants lefting fake can compared with 1.2 million in 1980. they could be exsting in her lifetime. >> i would like to see the day, because elephants are obviously one of the more emotional intelligence. research have shown they are
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very comparable to humans. for us to get to a state where humans care that little not only about themselves but wildlife would be a very sad day. >> in some places, ivory is worth more than gold. its true price is a bloody one. poachers poison the elephants and shoot them from helicopters sometimes with machine guns. botswana government is hosting a follow up meeting on international trade and endangered species. eight countries were accused of not doing enough. >> there is a lot more calling for regional collaboration across the board to count they are trend. it's not just a threat to wildlife. the proceeds from this particular trade or industry has been alleged that it can fund
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and maybe funding terrorism and other illegal activities, as well. >> as well as how ivory influences peace and security and the involvement of organized crime. the delegates will also discuss how to stem the demand for ivory in asia. >> a lot of the problem comes down to a lock of understanding about where ivory comes from. a survey by the international fund for animal we will tear found 70% of chinese didn't noel fantasy were killed for their tusks. >> six tons of seized ivory was he's recently crushed in the united states. it was confiscated over 25 years. unless all the countries involved act now, wildlife campaignists warn that tasks can be all that is left of the elephants. >> the international i've oary trade is band. on the black market, the price has soared to $1,000 a pound. authorities say that's a huge
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incentive to break the law. more than 22,000 elephant were killed last year in africa. >> a piece of hollywood history is up for sale. ♪ ♪ >> a gray wool suit gene kelly wore in the classic movie kicking in the rain is expected to sell for more than $20,000 when it hits the auction block friday. a memorabilia collector has owned the suit he picked up for $10 at m.g.m. studios. that's going to do it for this hour. we'll have more news right after a very short break. spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police
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deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news.
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consider this: the news of the day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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